Wednesday, April 13, 2016

BLUE GIRLS BURN FAST



BLUE GIRLS BURN FAST

One of my all time favorite feminist activists is Amandla Stenberg. She first really came into the maintream spotlight as Rue from The Hunger Games. With a newfound fame, she was able to speak out about intersectional feminism on a public platform. One of her favorite videos of mine is one that she did about cultural appropriation: Don't Cash Crop On My Cornrows. I knew what cultural appropriation was but in the same way that I could recognize chemistry terms from seventh grade. This video by Stenberg actually helped me understand the concept in a way that I could also look at new situations and determine what was cultural appropriation and why it was important. As I learn more and more about intersectional feminism and human rights, I'm still stumbling and making mistakes along the way, but each time that I read an interview from Stenberg or one of her blogs or see a video of hers, I walk away with a new understanding of myself and the world around me. 

In turn, I was obviously super excited and hardcore fangirled when I saw that she would be going to NYU for film school at the same time that I'll be moving there to start my job. 


More importantly, the point of all of this is to tell you about the short film she just produced. The film is called Blue Girls Burn Fast (scroll to bottom of page link for full video). The film focuses on a main character, Andy, a foster teen, who is navigating romance, life, and school. The film is thought provoking and beautifully made. Its flawless view of fluid sexuality promotes the idea that varied sexualities should be normalized aka this film handles sexuality how all films should in 2016 and in the future. The film moves through a variety of scenes, characters, emotions, and topics in a way that makes you walk away with questions about how we talk about and respond to a variety of different issues and situations. I have much praise for this film and the role that it plays in our society. I know it's eighteen minutes of your day, but trust me, it's more productive than scrolling through instagram or watching netflix reruns of Gossip Girl. 

2 comments:

  1. Though I have not watched the short film, your description of the film brought to mind the character, Jamal Lyon from the hit TV show Empire. In the show, Jamal is a huge music artist and he comes out to the world that he is gay. He receives a significant amount of support from the LGBT community. Yet, Jamal in season 2 of the show decides to pursue a relationship with a female artist after having several relationships with men. The LGBT community becomes outraged, because they have a hard time understanding why a gay man would want to date a woman. The show brings up the topic of sexual fluidity in the sense that Jamal decides to write a song about sexually fluid, in which he can be with whoever he wants and love whoever he wants. Jussie Smollet, the man who plays Jamal Lyon, did an interview with E News, in which he discusses the topic of sexual fluidity and why he is glad that the show decided to address the topic. People assume others can only be one way or the other sexuality, but there are so many different sexual preferences out there. I remember during one of our class discussions the website, Flexuality, which is a blog about human sexuality. I decided to take the test a while back out of curiosity and I must say I was a little surprised by my results. I was also surprised by how many different sexual preferences there were, because I always thought it was straight, bisexual, or gay. I would highly recommend for other people to take the test. I definitely want to watch the short film Blue Girls Burn Fast. Thank you for this post!

    Here is the link to Jussie Smollet's interview:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2n4Ihb4J2U

    Link to Flexuality website:

    https://flexuality.wordpress.com/

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  2. I want to first say that it is always good to remember that while we are all engaging in feminist conversations online and in class, we can still struggle to fully grasp concepts. What you said about "still stumbling and making mistakes" but being able to watch a video or read a blog by someone you look up to and walk away with a more clear understanding, that really stood out to me. It's important to continue to learn from other's so we do not fall prey to the ignorant belief that we know everything, especially when it comes to women and gender studies because the discipline is constantly evolving. So, I'm really glad you included that tidbit. I also look forward to watching that video (I really love Stenberg as well). Thanks for sharing such an awesome film and I hope you meet her in New York someday.

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